18

March

NFL Draft Prospect Profile: John Jenkins, DL Georgia

John Jenkins

Georgia DL John Jenkins.

Green Bay Packers NFL Draft prospect profile: DL John Jenkins

Player Information:

John Jenkins, DL Georgia
6-4, 346 pounds
Hometown: Meriden, CT

STATS

NFL Combine:

Bench: 30 reps

News and Notes:

Weight fluctuated between 336 and 376 pounds at Georgia. … He says he’s now educated on how to keep his weight down and weight will not be an issue in the NFL. … Body type screams nose tackle, but he played several positions on the D-line at Georgia. … Totaled 78 tackles and four sacks over four years at Georgia. … Credited with 14 QB pressures in two seasons, a lot for a guy his size. … Compares to B.J. Raji, both in his body type and tendency to get wiped out by double teams.

What they’re saying about him: 

  • NFL.com: “Jenkins is a massive junior college transfer with great upside as a run-stuffer, but is limited to being a nose tackle in a 3-4 scheme because of his lack of quickness. His impressive size and strength will likely make him coveted, but needs to improve his balance and pad-level.”
  • Doug Farrar: ”Will dance through trash in tight spaces and keeps the effort toward the ballcarrier even after he’s blocked out of a play. Comes off the snap with good intensity and gets into “fighting stance” quickly. Can play well enough in multiple gaps, though he’s ideally an interior defender at the NFL level. Played some end at Georgia and did it well enough for it to be a part of his NFL palette.”

Video:



Video Analysis:

  • Size immediately stands out, even before the film starts rolling. I have visions of a marketing campaign featuring Raji, Jenkins, Ryan Pickett and a cameo from Gilbert Brown.
  • Very quick in space. When he’s chasing down a play, I can’t believe how fast he is for his size.
  • Not as quick off the ball as I’d thought he’d be, especially when double-teamed. At times, it seems like he senses the double team before the snap and gets tentative.
  • Seems to get chopped down fairly often. Some scouting reports said all of his mass is in his upper body, making him easy to cut-block.
  • Really hard to move when blocking one-on-one. Just his sheer size makes it necessary to double-team him.
  • Showed some burst pass rushing inside, escially when getting leverage with his initial move.
9

March

NFL Draft Prospect Profile: Alec Ogletree, ILB Georgia

Alec Ogletree

Alec Ogletree

Green Bay Packers NFL Draft prospect profile: ILB Alec Ogletree

Player Information:

Alec Ogletree, ILB Georgia
6-2, 242 pounds
Hometown: Newnan, Georgia

STATS: College stats

NFL Combine:

40-yard dash: 4.70 seconds
Bench press: 20 reps
Vertical jump: 33.5 inches
Broad jump: 122 inches
3-cone drill: 7.16 seconds
20-yard shuttle: 4.39 seconds

News and Notes:

Suspended the first four games of the 2012 season for violating team rules. … Played safety as a freshman. … Moved to LB for sophomore season and missed six games with a broken foot. … One of the most athletic LBs in the draft. … Had 111 tackles, 11.5 tackles for loss and three sacks his final season. … Also broke up five passes, had an interception and blocked a field goal. … Twin brother Alexander played fullback at Georgia.

 What they’re saying about him: 

{pick comments from any draft site you like}

  • NFL.com: “Despite playing the last two years at inside linebacker in the Bulldogs 3-4 defense, it would not be surprising to see Ogletree make the switch to weakside linebacker in a defense that uses a four man front. The reason being is the junior struggles to get over top of blocks but does his best work chasing and closing. Expect the Bulldog to be a three down player if he cuts down on wasted steps. Since Ogletree is expected to impress in workouts, expect him to be a top-50 pick.
  • CBSSports.com: “The junior’s lanky frame (6-3, 234) and staggering closing speed make him a potentially more dynamic player at the next level than Manti Te’o, though Jones isn’t nearly as far along in the subtleties of the position, having only made the switch from safety two years ago.”

Video:

Video Analysis:

  • Nothing stood out in this clip that made me say, “Wow! I really want the Packers to draft this guy!”
  • Small. Could this guy really hold up on the inside of a 3-4 defense? Might be better suited on the outside of a 4-3 defense.
  • Once a lineman gets his hands on him, especially on the second level, it’s all over. Ogletree has no chance and doesn’t really fight with his hands to get off blocks.
  • Seems like he might have more of a go-for-the-big-hit mentality instead of a make-a-good-fundamental-tackle mentality.
24

March

NFL Draft Prospect Profile: Brandon Boykin, CB, Georgia

Georgia CB Brandon Boykin

Green Bay Packers draft prospect profile: Brandon Boykin, CB, Georgia

Player information:

  • Brandon Boykin, CB, Georgia
  • 5-foot-9, 182 lbs.
  • Broke his leg during the Senior Bowl, which robbed him of the opportunity to compete at the combine and Georgia Pro Day.

NFL Combine (DNP, leg):

  • N/A 40-yard dash
  • N/A 20-yard shuttle
  • N/A 3-cone drill
  • N/A broad jump
  • N/A vertical jump
  • N/A bench press reps

News & Notes:

A prep star in Georgia, Boykin stayed home and went to school in Athens. He appeared in 13 games his freshman season before going on to start 38 of the next 40 games for the Bulldogs. A jack-of-all-trades, Boykin registered nine interceptions, 19 tackles for losses and 18 passes broken up on defense, plus five return scores and three offensive touchdowns. He became the first player in SEC history to score three or more touchdowns of 100 yards. While Boykin is definitely on the short side (5-9) for cornerbacks, players his array of skills are hard to find. Boykin represents good value in the second round or later at a position that has three good players but struggled in 2011.

What they’re saying about him:

Frank Cooney (CBS Sports):  “Boykin may have a small frame, but he came up big to win the Paul Hornung Award as the nation’s most versatile player in 2011. He is a formidable athlete as both a cornerback and a kick returner. Boykin, who may run 40 yards under 4.4 seconds, had three touchdowns on kickoff returns as a sophomore, two for 100 yards each and then added another in 2010 to become the only player in SEC history with three plays of at least 100 yards. He is hardly bashful as a corner, where he surprises bigger opponents by getting right in their face as much as he can rather than playing off and using his speed to catch up.”

National Football Post (Wes Bunting): ”Plays much bigger/strong than his frame would indicate. Has the ability to press on the edge, but might be better suited to play as a slot guy in the NFL. Either way can play a role on a defense in either a man or zone scheme.”

1

April

Packers Prospect Profile – LB Justin Houston, University of Georgia

1) Profile:

Justin Houston

College: Georgia

Position: OLB (3-4), DE (4-3)

Height: 6’3″   Weight: 260 lbs.

Born: January 1, 1989 From: Statesboro, GA

2) High School / College Highlights: According to his Georgia bio, Houston was a class 4A All-State Honorable Mention his senior season, and was All-Region in both his junior and senior years.

Coming out of high school, Rivals.com ranked him as their No. 21 defensive end prospect, ESPN had him at No. 27, and Scout.com ranked him No. 42. During his junior season, Statesboro High won the class 4A State championship.

Houston decided to stay home and attend the University of Georgia. Like many mid-level freshman recruits, Houston began his college career by redshirting in 2007. He played in 13 games (2.5 sacks) the next season, but 2009 was the year that he really broke out. In 10 games, Houston had a team-leading 15 tackles for losses and 7.5 sacks, and was awarded with AP Second Team All-SEC honors.

While still somewhat of an unknown before last season, Houston stamped his name among the draft’s top pass-rushers with a dominant 13-game showing. He racked up 10 sacks, 18.5 tackles for losses and 44 quarterback pressures on his way to being named an AP First Team All-SEC selection. Originally slated in the middle rounds, Houston’s play last season shot himself into the first round discussion.

3) College Stats: 36 games/24 starts, 70 solo/26 assisted tackles, 20.0 sacks/134 yards lost, 38 tackles for losses/168 yards lost, 2 forced fumbles, 2 fumble recoveries, 5 passes broken up, 1 interception, 78 quarterback pressures.

4) NFL Combine Results: 4.68 second 40-yard dash, 30 bench presses, 36.5″ vertical jump, 10’5″ broad jump, 6.95 second cone drill, 4.37 second 20-yard shuttle, 11.46 60-yard shuttle.

5) Strengths/Weaknesses: His 4.68 40-yard dash at the combine suggests Houston might not be explosive off the edge, but that number is very misleading. Houston has an excellent first step, and his flexibility has allowed him to dip his shoulder around offensive tackles. He also counters the dip move with a solid outside-to-inside fake that kept SEC tackles on their heels all season.

Georgia also switched their defense to a 3-4 last season, so Houston has experience rushing the passer from a standing position. His performance at the both the combine and his pro day erased many of the big concerns about playing in space.