2

May

The Complete Green Bay Packers NFL Draft Class of 2011

Round 1 (32): Derrick Sherrod, OT, Mississippi State (@dsherrod78)

Sherrod measured 6’5” 321 lbs with a 35 3/8 inch wingspan and at the combine and posted a 5.18 second 40-yard dash, 23 bench presses, 28 inch vertical jump, 97 inch broad jump, 7.43 second 3-cone drill and 4.63 second 20-yard shuttle. Sherrod is one of the most decorated college football players in the nation both on and off the field; he was named to seven All-American teams this year as well as winning the National Football Foundation and College Hall of Fame Award, which is given to the top 16 players in the nation for their academic and leadership ability.  Sherrod graduated in August of 2010 with a 3.54 grade point average in business.

Round 2 (64): Randall Cobb, WR, Kentucky (@rcobb18)

Cobb measures in at 5-11, 196 pounds with 31″ arms. He posted a 4.46-second 40-yard dash, 16 bench-presses, 33.5″ vertical leap, 115″ broad jump, 7.08-second 3 cone drill, 4.34-second 20-yard shuttle and 11.56-second 60-yard shuttle.  Over his three years in college, Cobb racked up 5,000 all-purpose yards, including 1,661 receiving and 1,313 rushing. In his final year, Cobb posted 84 catches for 1,017 yards and was selected as a First Team All-American for his efforts.

Round 3 (96): Alex Green, RB, Hawaii
Green measures in at 6-0, 225 pounds with 32″ arms. Green posted a 4.53-second 40-yard dash, 20 bench-presses, 34″ vertical leap, 114″ broad jump, 6.91-second 3 cone drill and 4.15-second 20-yard shuttle. Playing in Hawaii’s pass-happy offense, Green was able to rush for 1,199 yards on 146 carries (8.2 ypc) and 18 touchdowns his senior season. He also caught 27 passes for 363 yards and another touchdown. Green was named Second Team All-WAC in 2010.

Round 4 (131): Davon House, CB, New Mexico State (@davonhouse4)

House measures in at 6-1, 200 pounds.  At the NFL Combine, he posted a 4.44-second 40-yard dash, 14 bench-presses, 4.12-second 20-yard shuttle and a 33.5″ vertical leap. House played 12 games as a true freshman and continued to improve throughout his entire college career. He intercepted 11 passes in four years and returned three for touchdowns. He also demonstrated an ability to stop the run, racking up 202 solo tackles.

Round 5 (141): D. J. Williams, TE, Arkansas (@dj45williams)

1

May

Green Bay Packers 2011 NFL Draft — Seventh Round, No. 233: DE Lawrence Guy

With the 233rd pick in the 2011 NFL draft, the Green Bay Packers selected Arizona State DE Lawrence Guy

He measures in at 6-4, 305 pounds.  At the NFL Combine, he posted a 4.96-second 40-yard dash, 28 bench-presses, 4.43-second 20-yard shuttle and a 29″ vertical leap.

College history

Highly recruited out of High School, Guy turned down offers from Oklahoma, Nebraska and other big-time programs to play for the Sun Devils. Guy has played every position on the defensive line for the Sun Devils, but mostly played tackle in a 4-3 defense.  Guy was a three-year starter and is leaving ASU with one year of eligibility left.

In 12 games in 2010, Guy ended the year with 41 tackles (14 solo), six tackles for loss, 1.5 sacks and a pair of pass break-ups..

Commentary

Here’s what I wrote about Guy in the CheeseheadTV Draft Guide:  ”Guy could be this year’s Mike Neal – an under-the-radar player with below average stats but a ton of potential. Where Neal’s best asset was his strength, Guy’s is the athleticism he displays for a man his size. He shows an explosive first step and never stops coming. Perfect body type for a five-technique end but needs to hit the weight room. The Packers make him Neal’s workout buddy – that should do it.”

I had him pegged as a fourth round pick, and so did most draft boards. He thus draws comparison to C. J. Wilson, another DL who was expected to go much higher than where the Packers drafted him. I was excited about the Wilson pick at the time (called it a steal) and I feel almost as good about this Lawrence Guy pick.

Guy has had to overcome dyslexia and attention deficit disorder. After a shaky start in college, Guy has worked hard to better himself in the classroom and as a person in addition to his play on the football field.

The official scouting report on Guy states, “Known primarily for his pass rushing skills, his size, strength and athletic ability make him a prime candidate to move to the ‘five technique’ defensive end position in a 3-4 alignment at the next level.” Then, from NFLDraftScout.com, “Guy’s statistics are solid (122 tackles, 23 tackles for loss and eight sacks in 35 games), but not spectacular, leading to some discounting his talents. Don’t be surprised when this Sun Devil defensive tackle proves to be anything but just another ‘Guy’” and hears his name called among the top 100 selections.”

30

April

Packers Defensive Possibilities in Rounds 4 and 5 of the 2011 NFL Draft

Here are six potential defensive targets for the Green Bay Packers in rounds four and five of today’s NFL Draft:

Lawrence Guy, DE, Arizona State, 6′ 5″, 300lbs.
All-Pacific 10 Conference honorable mention…Quarterfinalist for the Lott IMPACT Trophy (top collegiate defender)… Member of the Outland Trophy Watch List (top collegiate lineman)…Started all 12 games and ranked eighth on the team with 41 tackles (14 solos), including 1.5 sacks for minus six yards and six stops for losses totaling 14 yards…Key piece in a front wall that led the Pac-10 and placed 16th nationally, allowing just 119.67 yards per game on the ground…Made 39 plays vs. the ground game, holding ball carriers to just 58 yards (1.49 ypc), as the defender limited those runners to five first downs while producing nine third-down stops and another on fourth-down…Delivered six of those tackles inside the red zone, including four on goal-line plays, as he posted 10 total stops (assists/solos) for loss and six tackles that brought down ball carriers at the line of scrimmage no gain…Made two stops vs. the aerial attack, holding receivers to just six yards on those receptions (3.0 ypc), as he deflected two passes, including one on a fourth-down attempt

Cedric Thornton, DE, So. Arkansas, 6’3″, 301lbs
All-American and All-Gulf South Conference first-team selection by The NFL Draft Report…Listed as the most underrated defensive tackle prospect eligible for the 2011 NFL Draft and the top defensive player in the NCAA Division II ranks, according to that scouting information service…Added more than 30 pounds of muscle to his frame since the end of the 2009 campaign…Ranked third on the team with 54 tackles (28 solos) that included 1.5 sacks for minus 7 yards and thirteen quarterback pressures…Tied for 11th in the Division II ranks with 14.0 stops for losses totaling 195 yards…Made 54 plays vs. the ground game, limiting those runners to 36 yards (0.67 ypc), as he registered 16 total stops for loss (solos/assists), took down ball carriers at the line of scrimmage for no gain nine times, posted 12 of his hits inside the red zone, including six on goal-line plays and made six third-down tackles, with one more on a fourth-down snap vs. opposing rushers…Against the pass, none of the 15 passes targeted into his area were completed, as he delivered seven thirddown stops…Two of his 13 pressures caused interceptions, as one pass theft was returned for a touchdown and another set up a Muleriders’ field goal.

29

April

Green Bay Packers 2011 NFL Draft — 3rd Round, No. 96: RB Alex Green

With the 96th overall pick in the 2011 NFL draft, the Green Bay Packers selected Hawaii running back Alex Green.

He measures 6-0, 225 pounds with 32″ arms. Green posted a 4.53-second 40-yard dash, 20 bench-presses, 34″ vertical leap, 114″ broad jump, 6.91-second 3 cone drill and 4.15-second 20-yard shuttle.

College History

Playing in Hawaii’s pass-happy offense, Green was able to rush for 1,199 yards on 146 carries (8.2 ypc) and 18 touchdowns his senior season. He also caught 27 passes for 363 yards and another touchdown. Green was named Second Team All-WAC in 2010.

Green was only at Hawaii for two seasons, having transferred from Butte Community College in California—the same place that produced Aaron Rodgers.

One other thing of note: Green rushed for 372 yards against New Mexico State, a performance that broke Hawaii’s single-game rushing record.

Commentary

I’ll admit to knowing little about Green when the pick was made, but I had heard from some of the talking heads that he was a sleeper candidate at the running back position.

NFL Network’s Mike Mayock certainly gave him a vote confidence when he said that “Green will be an impact player this year for the Green Bay Packers.”

After a little digging, there was plenty of other solid reviews on Green. Russ Lande of The Sporting News said that Green could develop into an “Arian Foster-type back.” Foster rushed for 1,616 yards and 16 touchdowns last season for the Texans.

It would obviously be fantastic if that scenario unfolded, but Green could be a weapon for the Packers right away. He has good vision and hits the hole hard, and his big frame fits what the Packers like in their backs. Green also has experience catching the ball out of the backfield, making him a potential replacement for Brandon Jackson in third down roles.

Video

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Zach Kruse is a 23-year-old sports journalist with a passion for the Green Bay Packers. He currently lives in Wisconsin and is working on his journalism degree, while also covering prep sports for The Dunn Co. News.

You can read more of Zach's Packers articles on AllGreenBayPackers.com.

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28

April

Green Bay Packers 2011 NFL Draft – 1st Round, Pick 32: Derek Sherrod

With their 1st pick in the 2011 NFL Draft, the Green Bay Packers select offensive tackle Derek Sherrod  from the Mississippi State University.

Sherrod measured 6’5” 321 lbs with a 35 3/8 inch wingspan and at the combine and posted a 5.18 second 40-yard dash, 23 bench presses, 28 inch vertical jump, 97 inch broad jump, 7.43 second 3-cone drill and 4.63 second 20-yard shuttle.

 

College history: Derek Sherrod is one of the most decorated college football players in the nation both on and off the field; he was named to seven All-American teams this year as well as winning the National Football Foundation and College Hall of Fame Award, which is given to the top 16 players in the nation for their academic and leadership ability.  Sherrod graduated in August of 2010 with a 3.54 grade point average in business.

On the football field he played in 47 games and started 36 of them at left offensive tackle, racking up 319 knockdown blocks (8.86 per game, highest of any draft eligible offensive linemen in this years draft), and graded out at 92.8% in blocking efficiency.  Sherrod is more of a pass blocker than a run blocker, just like the Packers like them.  He’s also seen as more of a technician than an athletic specimen, which again is just like the Packers like them (see Bryan Bulaga)

Commentary: The Packers waited until they had 30 second left before turning in their pick; this probably meant that the Packers were fielding trade options until the last minute (as is Ted Thompsons MO), but apparently the value wasn’t there for the Packers so they selected their best player available, which was Sherrod.  Sherrod is likely to be the future tackle once Chad Clifton decides to hang it up or as Bryan Bulaga’s replacement once he switches over to the left when Chad Clifton finally decides to hang it up.  Who will be where?  In actuality, it doesn’t really matter.  The Packers have stated that they prefer to have two “left tackles” at bookend; with defenses commonly shifting personnel to get the best match ups, the best pass rusher is no longer over the blind slide, the best rusher is now over the weakest player.

Video:

On Packers.com

 

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Thomas Hobbes is a staff writer for Jersey Al’s AllGreenBayPackers.com.

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5

April

The WORST Green Bay Packer First Round Draft Picks of the Last 50 Years…

As the 2010 NFL Draft approaches, and anticipation builds, do the Green Bay Packers really know what they will be getting with their first round draft pick?  History says, um, not necessarily. Submitted for your approval:

1980 Bruce Clark, DT – Selected fourth overall

(taken before Art Monk, Matt Millen, Otis Wilson, Dwight Stevenson)

Out of Penn State University, Bruce Clark was a College All American and the first player to win the Lombardi Trophy as a junior. He went on to have a good career, but not for the Packers. Drafted by the Packers with the 4th pick of the draft, he instead signed with the Toronto Argonauts of the Canadian Football League.

While money was one factor, reportedly the main reason he went north was he didn’t want to play middle guard (now known as nose tackle) in the Packers 3-man line. This was easily Bart Starr’s biggest blunder as GM. Most likely the topic was discussed with Clark, but Starr probably was confidant he could convince Clark to do what is best for the team. Unfortunately, the ultra-loyal Starr probably underestimated the new attitude among athletes – me first.

This selection makes the list not because of the player’s lack of talent, but simply because the Packers got absolutely nothing out of a high first round pick. An inexcusable blunder.

1987 Brent Fullwood, RB – Selected fourth overall

(taken before Shane Conlan, Rod Woodson, Jim Harbaugh, Tim McDonald)

Out of Auburn University, Brent Fullwood gained 3700 yards rushing and scored 24 touchdowns for the Tigers. Green Bay made him the fourth overall pick of the draft, and expected big things. Fullwood never really delivered, however. Fullwood lasted only 4 years with the Packers, starting 30 games and rushing for 1700 yards. Almost half of those yards came in 1989, when he actually was named to the Pro Bowl.

Unfortunately, his career took a nosedive after that. Constant injuries and a seeming lack of motivation caused the Packers to quickly tire of him. The next training camp the Packers were willing to waive him, but managed to convince the Cleveland Browns to take their former number one draft pick for a future low-round draft choice. Fullwood never played a game for Cleveland.

One decent year for a top-five first round draft pick… spells B-U-S-T