17

March

NFL Draft Prospect Profile: TE Jace Amaro

Jace Amaro

TE Jace Amaro

Packers prospect profile:  TE Jace Amaro

Player Information:

Jace Amaro,  TE  Texas Tech, 6-5, 265 pounds  Hometown: San Antonio, TX

STATS

NFL Combine:

40 time: 4.74

Vertical jump: 33″

225 lb. bench: 28 reps

Broad jump: 9’10″

News and Notes:

AP first team All American . . .had 1,352 receiving yards in 2013 and averaged 104 yards per game. . .His 106 catches were most by a college tight end in 2013 and second most all time in NCAA history. . .was arrested in 2012 on suspicion of unauthorized use of a debit card.

 What they’re saying about him: 

  • CBSSports.com: Lining up mostly in the slot, Amaro is a big, fluid athlete who uses his thick body to gain proper positioning in coverage and uses his large, soft mitts to attack the ball in the air. He is a balanced route-runner and collects himself when changing direction with smooth moves to create separation. Amaro is dangerous after the catch and isn’t an easy ballcarrier to bring down, running with power and toughness.  Some maturity and attitude questions that will need to be addressed. Receiving tight end who won’t be a fit for all schemes unless he can get in an NFL training program and bulk up
  • NationalFootballPost.com:  Very athletic for a big guy and has excellent speed and body control. He is quick off the line and is a very good route runner. He can break down and get in and out of cuts very quickly for a big guy. On the shorter one-cut routes, he consistently gains separation. He has the play speed to get open on post and flag routes versus defensive backs. He has very good hands and can adjust to the ball. He is a competitive and tough kid who consistently competes for the ball in traffic. After the catch, he has a quick burst to pull away and has the quick feet and moves to make a defender miss. He uses his size well and can easily break tackles. He is an instant mismatch because of his size and athleticism. As a blocker, he looks like a big wide receiver blocking. He can use his hands and can stay with a block but he is not overly physical.  Amaro is the type of “tight end” that most NFL teams are now looking for. He has the speed and athleticism to play split out and can really be called a jumbo wide receiver.
25

February

The Packers should choose a different flavor of tight end

At the moment there are 3 “flavors” of tight ends; everyone’s favorite at the moment is chocolate and that would be the “oversized wide receiver” tight ends like Jimmy Graham or Jordan Cameron, who are players who can take the top off of a defensive secondary while posing a size match up for cornerbacks and safeties while causing speed problems for linebackers.  These types of players are what the NFL craves right now and with the Seattle Seahawks winning the Super Bowl with bigger more physical corners, the most logical response would be for NFL offenses to counter with big and fast tight ends who can beat bigger corners at their own game.  Strawberry would be the “move” tight end, much like Aaron Hernandez or Jordan Reed, who while aren’t the biggest or fastest have the most utility of the group, being able to operate decently as a inline tight end, out in the slot or even as a fullback in some situations (the Packers in particular love this kind of tight end).  Finally, there is vanilla, the old and boring standby of inline or “complete” tight end such as Jason Witten or Todd Heap who were capable inline blockers but could also operate as a safety value for a quarterback in the short passing game.  Each flavor has its own advantages and disadvantages and that’s fluctuated over time as offenses and defenses have evolved in the NFL.

When looking at the Packers under the Mike McCarthy/Ted Thompson regime, the flavors that appeal most have definitely been chocolate (Jermichael Finley, Brandon Bostick) and strawberry (Tom Crabtree, Spencer Havner, Ryan Taylor, DJ Williams) with almost no emphasis being placed on blocking.  And it’s easy to see why, with Brett Favre and Aaron Rodgers at the helm, plays could be extended, wide receivers got the majority of the attention on offense and running backs, outside of a couple years of Ahman Green in his prime, took a back seat to the offensive passing game.  Add to that the aerial explosion that occurred starting around that time and it’s easy to see why the Packers, along with pretty much every other NFL team, starting looking at tight ends more as receivers than blockers.  However, we might just start to see Mike McCarthy and Ted Thompson pick a different favorite flavor this coming draft.