3

November

Packers-Bears Rivalry: A Fan’s Perspective

Bears Packers Rivalry

The Green Bay Packers have finally taken control over their rivalry with the Chicago Bears.

Editor’s Note: A long-time reader and commenter here at AllGreenPackers.com, “Bearmeat” has been kind enough to provide us with his own perspective of the rivalry between the Green Bay Packers and Chicago Bears. Perhaps many of you share a similar view of this storied history…

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I’ve been following the Packers since I can remember. My first words were “S#!%! S#!%! S#!%!” which I said to copy my angry father’s words while watching the Packers suck in the early 1980′s. My first Packers memories were the early Lindy Infante teams in the late 80′s. They were bad. I mean… Really. Really. Bad.

I remember thinking before one Packers-Bears games in 1988, “If Green Bay can just win this game, they’ll only be 3 games back in the division and who knows what could happen from there.” They got crushed. The Bears won the division and finished 12-4. The Packers finished dead last at 4-12. Again. I remember watching the Packers lose to the Rich Kotite coached Jets in 1990. In overtime. On a Jeff Query fumbled punt. (The Jets finished 2-14 that year, I believe. We were 6-10.)

My entire youth as a football fan sucked. The Packers sucked. The Badgers sucked. Even my high school football team annually sucked. To put in context how bad the Packers were compared to the well-run organizations at the time, by the time I was 11, the Packers record against their arch rivals (the Bears) was 57-81-6. An atrocious .395 all-time winning percentage.

Then Ron Wolf, Mike Holmgren, Reggie White, and one Brett Favre showed up in 1992. Since Favre took the reins as Green Bay’s quarterback, the Packers are 31-11 against Chicago. The all-time series is still in the Bears favor, but the record is now only 92-88-6. Let that soak in: the Packers have beaten the Bears 31 times in their past 42 games.

Making matters worse for Bears fans, Green Bay has only had 2 different quarterbacks play in those games: Brett Favre and Aaron Rodgers. Both are destined to be remembered as members of the best 10 to ever play the position. Both will be voted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame on their first ballot. Meanwhile the Bears have had 22 quarterbacks play for them in that same timeframe. (Go here for reference. I’m not going to list them all, but suffice it to say not many of the names exactly passes the “Who?” test.)

12

December

Packers-Bears: Brandon Marshall adds fuel to the fire

Bears WR Brandon Marshall

Bears WR Brandon Marshall

The Packers-Bears rivalry has been going on for 91 years. The Bears have won 92 of those games, the Packers have won 87, and they’ve played to six ties since the rivalry began in 1921.

When the Bears named Lovie Smith head coach in 2004, he clearly stated that his team’s No.1 goal would be to beat Green Bay.

But recently, the Packers have owned the rivalry. Green Bay has won seven of the past eight matchups, including a victory in the NFC Championship at Soldier Field in the 2010 season.

The most recent chapter of the longstanding rivalry was week two this year when the Packers dominated the Bears 23-10 at Lambeau Field. The offense was crisp, and the defense was stellar.

The Green Bay defense was tough against the run and the secondary silenced the Bears’ top receiver–Brandon Marshall.

Marshall caught just two passes for 24 yards in the first meeting. And after the game, Tramon Williams and Charles Woodson were vocal in their assessment of the Bears’ offense, and mainly, quarterback Jay Cutler.

“It’s the same old Jay,” Woodson said after the game. ”We don’t need luck, Jay will throw us the ball. Proof is in the pudding.”

Cutler, of course, publicly wished the Packers’ secondary “good luck” before the two teams met at Lambeau Field. It seems Cutler’s well wishes turned out well for the Packers, as cornerback Tramon Williams caught as many passes from Cutler as Marshall did–two.

And on Wednesday morning, it was clear that there was no love lost between Marshall and the Packers. Tyler Dunne, of the Milwaukee Journal-Sentiel, got the scoop from Marshall’s time at the podium.

To that comment, one might ask this question–who really cares who Marshall wants to give the credit to? Dom Capers dialed up the scheme, and the players made it happen. Williams shadowed Marshall for most of the night, and Capers opted to have safety help over the top with either Charles Woodson or Morgan Burnett.

Marshall is the Bears’ only true game-breaker on the perimeter, so what else is Capers supposed to do? From coaching to execution, the Packers did their job. Period.

Oh yeah, and Marshall dropped a wide open touchdown in the game as well. But anyways. What’s next?

22

January

Packer – Bears Rivalry & History: Video 3-pack

21

January

NFC Championship Preview – Packers vs Bears Rivalry Reaches New Heights – The Playoffs

Green Bay Packers, Chicago Bears, and the NFC Championship.

I don’t think it can possibly get any better than this.

After the Packers impressive 48-21 over the Atlanta Falcons and the Bears’ easier than it looked 35-24 win over the upstart Seattle Seahawks, both teams prepare to meet for only the second time in their long and storied rivalry. For the first time since 1941, the Packers and Bears get together for– to steal a line from Brent Musberger–all the Tostitos.

Since the Packers faced the Bears twice already this season, I don’t think it’s necessary to break them down once again. We know them well enough by now and the same could be said for the Bears knowing the Packers. It’s a division rivals against one another, so the familiarity between the two teams is rather obvious.

Instead let’s go ahead jump to FIVE (hey, it’s a big game alright?) keys to the NFC Championship

1. The condition of Soldier Field

Much has been made this week over the shape the sod in Soldier Field is in. It was already showing noticeable damage during the Seahawks game last week, and with brutal cold settling in across the entire Midwest, there hasn’t been enough time to re-sod the entire football field

With the game also expected to be played under cold temperatures, the condition of the field will be crucial to both teams. The Bears obviously have had some experience playing in it and the Packers have not. You would think that would give the Bears an edge, but the Packers have played their share of games in Lambeau with the sod coming up in chunks.

While Lambeau has never been in this bad of shape, both teams will likely struggle with poor field conditions.

2. The officiating crew
In this week’s sign of the apocalypse, the NFL announced that Terry McAuley’s crew will be calling the NFC Championship Game.

Why is this significant?

Remember the Week 3 game in Soldier Field against the Bears where the Packers were flagged for a staggering 18 penalties? McAuley’s crew worked that game.

Will they do the same in this game?

24

September

Packers Vs. Bears Hate Week – Funny Videos 3-Pack

23

September

Green Bay Packers Vs Chicago Bears: Great Moments From a Classic Rivalry

In the very first meeting between the Packers and the Bears in 1921, there was a single moment that would foretell a future of heated battles. Chicago’s John (Tarzan) Taylor threw a sucker punch that broke the nose of Packers tackle Howard Buck. It would prove to be the opening salvo in what became a long and tenuous rivalry between Green Bay and Chicago.

7,000 fans at Wrigley field watched the Bears shut out the Packers that day by a score of 20-0. While a mere 200 miles separates these two cities, the differences couldn’t be greater. Small town Green Bay vs. big city Chicago. In 1921, Chicago was the second largest city in the country with a population of 2.7 million people. Green Bay was a blue-collar paper mill town with a population of only 31,000 people.

But while the cities’ demographics are at opposite ends of the spectrum, they do share a common bond, one of football greatness.

With Curly Lambeau and George Halas steering the ship, these two teams established themselves early on as the standard to aspire to. The Packers have won the most Championships in NFL History (12) and the Bears are second all-time with nine. The Bears have won 17 Division Championships, the Packers 13.

A total of 52 Pro Football Hall of Fame members (28 for the Bears and 24 for the Packers) have played in this rivalry. Names like Bronco Nagurski, Johnny Blood McNally, Red Grange, Don Hutson, Sid Luckman, Bart Starr, Gayle Sayers, Paul Hornung, Dick Butkus, Ray Nitschke, Walter Payton, Bret Favre.

These two teams epitomized what football should be. As renowned sports author Dick Schaap once said, “If you want to draw a picture of football, you just draw Ray Nitschke’s face and Dick Butkus’ face. That tells you all you have to know about the game.”

Over the 90 years of this rivalry, there have been many moments that helped define this rivalry. Let’s take a look at just a few that epitomize what this rivalry is all about..

1924: Ejected for fighting: The first time players were ever ejected from an NFL game for fighting was naturally during a Packers-Bears game. Bears end Frank Hanny and Packers end Walter Voss were tossed from the game before the end of the first half, as verbal sparring led to fisticuffs. Hanny would be ejected from a Bears-Packers game once again in 1926 and the pattern of nastiness had been established.